Tuesday, 27 May 2014

Ancient gold mine of Sakdrissi

In 2004, German archaeologists from Ruhr-University Bochum discovered the gold mine in Sakdrissi, Georgia. Dated to the third millennium BC, it is one of the oldest known gold mines in the world and has been deemed the most important prehistoric mining site in Europe. Using stone hammers and antler picks the Bronze Age miners worked the mine to obtain the precious metal.
The nine-hectare site, called Sakdrisi-Kachagiani, lies several kilometres from Dmanisi, a small village in the Kvemo Kartli region of Georgia.
The mine is 150 feet below the surface and the walls show fire-setting and crushing work with hammers. Research has determined that it was in use for 600 years between 3,400 BC and 2,800 BC.

A remarkable array of finds within the mine allowed a detailed understanding of how the ore was mined, processed and prepared for use over 5000 years ago.
The initial excavation at the gold mine was complemented by work on an Early Bronze Age settlement and the nearby area of Dmanisi is a significant site for the study of human origins. Early human fossils discovered at Dmanisi, dubbed Homo georgicus, were found between 1991 and 2005. At 1.8 million years old, H. georgicus may have been a separate species of Homo, predating Homo erectus, and represent the earliest stage of human presence in the Caucasus.

The hominid remains are the oldest found outside of Africa. Then, last year, archaeologists made another dramatic discovery, a fifth skull which prompted scientists to hypothesise that all Homo species may not have been multiple human species at all, but instead variants of a single species.
Although the site had been given protection according to Georgian Heritage laws in 2006, the election of a new government saw pressure put on the ministry of culture. A commission was set up at the beginning of June 2013 to remove the status of Sakdrissi as a protected monument.

A gold mining company called RMG Limited have now obtained the mineral rights. Its proposed opencast gold mine will swallow the area of prehistoric mining.
In a letter to the Georgian government, Professor Dr Hermann Parzinger, President of the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation and German Association of Archaeology, said: “Sakdrisi is the oldest gold mine worldwide and therefore a unique heritage site not only of Georgia, but of mankind. It should not be sacrificed to pure economic interests.” He added, “not just Georgia, also Europe, will lose one of its most important prehistoric mining sites forever.
The Caucasus was one of the most important ore-containing mountain ranges of the ancient world.
As the country of the “Golden Fleece”, it includes the western part of Georgia, Colchis, a name synonymous, in ancient times, with an abundance of gold. The giant Prometheus, the first ever “metallurgist”, was chained to the rocks of the Caucasus by the gods, and even today archaeologists are overwhelmed by the abundance of metals in the prehistoric find complexes in this region.




http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-evolution-human-origins/what-worth-more-gold-or-knowledge-about-human-origins-001451



Sunday, 25 May 2014

Famous Diamonds IV

The Chopard Chameleon Diamond is a 31.32 carat oval-cut chameleon diamond and the largest known.

The chameleon diamond has the ability to temporarily change colour after heating or long storage in the dark.
The Nur-ul-ain, “light of the eye” is a brilliant-cut oval diamond of around 60 carats. Together with the even larger Darya-i-noor diamond, it is considered one of the two most-celebrated gems among the Iranian crown jewels.
The Darya-i-noor, ‘sea of light’ is the world’s largest pink diamond, weighing 186 carats. It is table cut with exceptional clarity. The diamond came from India's famous Golconda mine and is part of the crown jewels of Iran.
The Portuguese Diamond weighs 127.01 carats and is graded M in color and VS-1 in clarity, with very strong blue fluorescence. Its unusual octagonal emerald cut makes it one of the world's most magnificent gems.
The Moon Of Baroda is a 24.04 carat canary yellow diamond once worn by both Empress Therese of Austria and Marilyn Monroe.
The Golden Eye. This 43.51 carat internally flawless fancy yellow diamond was seized in a drug sting and auctioned off by the U.S. Government in 2011 for $2,480,000.




See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2013/10/chameleon-diamonds.html
See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2014/04/the-imperial-crown-jewels-of-iran.html


Saturday, 3 May 2014

More Treasures of the British Museum

The British Museum in London is dedicated to human history and culture. Its permanent collection of some 8 million works is among the largest and most comprehensive in existence, and originates from all continents.

The British Museum was established in 1753. The museum first opened to the public in 1759.

This Mughal gold pendant is inlaid with flat-cut rubies and emeralds and a large faceted diamond, in the pattern of a flying bird, against a leafy background of rubies.

The Middleham Jewel was found near Middleham Castle in North Yorkshire in 1985. The diamond-shaped gold pendant is adorned with a large sapphire. It is intricately engraved, on the front with an image of the Holy Trinity and on the back with the Nativity. 1400AD - 1499AD

Diamond and platinum clip brooch containing an 17th-19th century carved Mughal emerald with a floral motif.

Gold locket with the hair of Queen Marie Antoinette

(Click on Images)



See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2013/12/treasure-of-british-museum-i.html
See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2014/03/india-jewels-that-enchanted-world.html
See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2013/12/famous-gemstones.html

Thursday, 1 May 2014

Amazing Metal Detector Discoveries

The "Boot of Cortez" is one of the most unusual nuggets in the World, and at 389.4 ounces Troy (32.4 Troy pounds), it is the largest surviving placer nugget discovered in the Western Hemisphere.

The solid gold nugget was found in the Mexican Sonora Desert near the Arizona border in 1989. It was found by a local prospector using a metal detector he bought at Radio Shack.The nugget sold for $1,853,500.00 at auction in Dallas, in 2008.
An amateur prospector discovered a huge gold nugget with an estimated value of more than $300,000 in Australia's Victoria state in 2013.

The nugget weighing 177 ounces, or 5.5 kilograms was unearthed with a metal detector just outside Ballarat in a popular area for prospecting.

Three-year-old James Hyatt may go down as one of the luckiest babies in history. Out for an afternoon walk with his dad in Essex, England in 2010, he was taking a turn with the detector when he discovered a one-inch pendant featuring engravings of the Virgin Mary clutching a cross along with “the five wounds of Christ,” believed to date from the 16th century.

Likely worn by royalty, the rare 16th century gold reliquary pendant was used to hold religious relics.
One month after 30-year-old Nick Davies bought his metal detector in 2009, he found the largest collection of Roman coins, called “nummi,” in recent British history. The estimated 10,000 coins date to the reign of Constantine I, when Britain was being used to produce food for the Roman Empire.

The coins are all bronze and silver-washed bronze nummi, and date to the period between AD 313 and 335.
One hour into Dave Booth’s first metal detecting mission in Stirlingshire, Scotland in 2009, he made the discovery of a lifetime. Grouped together in the soil were four gold, silver and copper torcs. They date to between 300 and 100 BC and were buried deliberately at some point in antiquity.

The treasure was valued at $1.5 million and is considered to be the most significant discovery of Iron Age metalwork in Scotland.
When a neighbor showed 7-year-old Lucas Hall his collection of Civil War–era bullets that he'd found on his Virginia property using a metal detector, the boy became instantly hooked.

One week after Hall received a detector for his birthday he found a cavalry sword ... described as an 1840 or 1860 lightweight saber.