Saturday, 30 July 2016

Carthage


The bitterly fought Punic Wars (“punicus” being Latin for Phoenician), waged between 264 and 146 BCE when Carthage was finally defeated. The city was razed to the ground and the very earth salted by vengeful Romans.
At its peak, the ancient North African city of Carthage rivaled the city of Rome for military and economic control of the western Mediterranean.

Carthage was one of the largest cities of the Hellenistic period and was among the largest cities in preindustrial history. Today, its ruins are a UNESCO World Heritage Site in the suburbs of the Tunisian capital.
Tanit served as the special protector deity of the city of Carthage.
Carthage was a Phoenician colony and they were related to the Hebrews and the Canaanites. They shared much in common, including the use of the shekel as the primary unit of money. Likewise, the Carthaginians worshiped a variety of deities from the ancient Middle East.

One in particular was the goddess Tanit. A Phoenician goddess of war Tanit was also a virgin mother goddess and a fertility symbol.

The horse was a symbol of power and was greatly revered by the Carthaginians. It was found on almost all of the city’s coinage.
The ancient city was destroyed by the Romans in the Third Punic War in 146 BC then re-developed as Roman Carthage, which became the major city of the Roman Empire in the province of Africa.

The Roman city was occupied by the Muslim conquest of the Maghreb in 698. The site was abandoned until the early 20th century when it began to develop into a coastal suburb of Tunis. It was incorporated as Carthage municipality in 1919.