Tuesday, 26 July 2016

Israel displays ancient mummy with modern-day afflictions

Israel's national museum is set to display a 2,200-year-old Egyptian mummy of a man who was afflicted with modern-day illnesses such as osteoporosis and tooth decay.

The illnesses, discovered using a CT scan, indicate that during his lifetime, the man was largely sedentary, avoided manual labour in the sun and probably ate a carbohydrate-heavy diet.
Thanks to Egyptian embalming processes and Jerusalem's dry climate, the mummy's bones, teeth and remnants of blood vessels were found largely intact. The mummy was also found to have had tooth cavities.

Researchers studied the mummy's remains earlier this year using a CT scanner, technology that allowed them to discover the diseases and determine the mummy was a man who lived to what was at the time a relatively old age of 30 to 40 years. He was originally 167 centimetres (5-foot-6) tall but that either in his lifetime or afterward, he had shrunk to 154 centimetres (5-foot-1). His apparently sedentary lifestyle, as well as inscriptions on his coffin, indicates he was a priest.