Thursday, 27 October 2016

Waitress accidentally breaks Townley Venus statue

A catering worker snapped the thumb off a priceless Roman statue during an event held at the British Museum. The caterer smacked her head on the marble hand of the world-renowned Townley Venus statue as she rose from bending down.

The British Museum described it as an “unfortunate incident”. Museum workers have reportedly managed to glue the thumb back onto the statue, which they describe as being fully restored.
The Townley Venus is a 2.14 m (7 ft) marble statue that dates from the first or second century AD. It is adapted from a lost Greek original statue, dating from the fourth century BC, and depicts the goddess Venus with her torso nude.

The statue was excavated at Ostia, a harbour city of ancient Rome in 1775.

Wednesday, 26 October 2016

Eureka

"Eureka" comes from the Ancient Greek word εὕρηκα heúrēka, meaning "I have found (it)" It is an interjection used to celebrate a discovery or invention. It is a transliteration of an exclamation attributed to Ancient Greek mathematician and inventor Archimedes.

He reportedly proclaimed "Eureka! Eureka!" after he had stepped into a bath and noticed that the water level rose. He suddenly understood that the volume of water displaced must be equal to the volume of the part of his body he had submerged. The volume of irregular objects could be measured with precision, a previously intractable problem. He is said to have leapt out of his bathtub and run through the streets of Syracuse naked.
Archimedes' insight led to the solution of the problem of measuring gold's purity. Hiero of Syracuse suspected, correctly, he had been cheated by a goldsmith removing gold and adding the same weight of silver to a crown he commissioned.

Equipment for weighing objects with good precision already existed, and now that Archimedes could also measure volume, their ratio would give the object's density, an important indicator of purity. The answer was now simple ... balance the crown against pure gold in air, and then submerge the scale with crown and gold in water to see if they still balance.

Thursday, 20 October 2016

Ancient Indian artifacts find their way home from Australia

Three more ancient artifacts have been returned to India from Australia. Most of the pieces in Australia have been acquired from the New York gallery of smuggler Subhash Kapoor.

It is more than four years since Subhash Kapoor was arrested and extradited to India. As recently as July 4, the National Gallery of Australia was talking about returning two of its artefacts following fresh evidence of links to the 68-year-old, once accused of “having created a black-market Sotheby’s”.
A sandstone stele of Rishabhanata from the 10th century
The highlight of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to America were the return to India of over 200 stolen artifacts, many of them linked to Kapoor. In September 2014, then Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott returned a 900-year-old Shiva sculpture. In October 2015, German Chancellor Angela Merkel returned a 10th-century Durga idol stolen from Kashmir.

Over 30 years, Kapoor is believed to have traded in hundreds of antiques, including statues and paintings, now believed to be stolen. His gallery, Art of the Past, was located at the heart of Manhattan’s art circle.


Subhash Kapoor

See ----->http://psjfactoids.blogspot.ca/2016/06/us-returns-over-200-artifacts-to-india.html
See ----->http://psjfactoids.blogspot.ca/2016/05/mystery-of-missing-gods.html

Monday, 17 October 2016

Ancient Gold coins top $3.4 million CNG auction


Gold oktadrachm of Antiochos III circa 222–187 BC, Seleukid Empire. Sold for $77,350 in VF
Classical Numismatic Group’s sale 103 produced top results. Their September auction hammered $2,826,186 on a pre-sale estimate of $1,992,300, for a clearance rate of 98.30 percent.
Gold Stater. Kroisos, c. 561-546 BC. $ 71,000
Gold aureus of Pertinax. He reigned as Emperor for just 86 days in 193 C.E. before being murdered by his Praetorian guard. EF $56,525. A very rare Qing dynasty pattern gold liang made $49,980.
A superb gold medal of Charles II struck for presentation to naval officers who distinguished themselves in the 1665 Battle of Lowestoft. No more than five examples are known. $ 50,000

Thursday, 13 October 2016

World's Most Expensive Necklaces


Chopard Magnificent Diamond and Emerald Necklace - Necklace features 191 carats of emeralds, set between 16 carats of diamonds. Price: $3m.

De Beers’ Marie Antoinette Necklace features more than 181 carats of diamonds, including a monster 8 carat, pear-shaped white diamond as a centerpiece. All of the jewels are set in platinum. $ 3.7m

Neil Lane’s Diamond Necklace features 140 carats of pear-shaped, cushion-shaped and teardrop-shaped diamonds, set in platinum $4m.

Diamond Pendant Necklace by Christie’s sold at an auction in 2001. Pear diamond weighs 47.49 carats. $4.8m

James W. Currens the Red Scarlet necklace was sold for $5.1 million in 2012.

The “Mrs. Winston”: $5.8 Million

The Etcetera Burmese Ruby necklace became the most expensive ruby-based necklace of all time when it sold for $6.4 in 2013.

Christie’s Diamond Necklace. 52 round diamonds weighing a total of 104.84 carats sold for $8.14m 2013.

Leviev’s Vivid Yellow Diamond Pendant. 77.12 carat vivid yellow diamond with a string of white diamonds, the asking price is set at $10m.
Garrard’s Heart of the Kingdom Ruby necklace features as its centerpiece a nearly 41-carat, super rare, heart-shaped Burma ruby.

The brilliant stone is surrounded by more than 150 diamonds. $14m

Winston’s version of the Heart of the Ocean Diamond necklace with a real blue diamond of 15 carats. $ 20m
The Hutton-Mdivani necklace by Cartier sold for $27.4 million, a world record for a Cartier jewel.

For hundreds of years, jadeite has been a symbol of supreme status and wealth and this stunning bead necklace is undeniably one of the best examples of its type in the world. It was last offered on the market in 1994 and fetched $2m – a record at the time for a piece of jadeite jewellery.
The most expensive necklace ever made is estimated to be worth $55 million.

The jewelry, known as L'Incomparable, features a large yellow stone suspended from a rose gold setting with 90 white diamonds and weighs 637 carats in total.

The necklace was made by luxury jeweler Mouawad and features a yellow, internally flawless diamond weighing 407 carats with 90 white diamonds weighing nearly 230 carats. The rough stone was found in a pile of mining tailings by a young girl in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Wednesday, 12 October 2016

Untouched ancient burial chamber found in Turkey’s Muğla

A burial chamber dating back to 2,400 years ago was unearthed at a construction site in the southwestern province of Muğla’s Milas district. Officials found 103 artifacts in the burial chamber, untouched and unlooted for millennia.
The burial chamber was unearthed close to the holy road between the city of Mylasa, which was the capital of the Karia region in the ancient era, and the Labraunda religious center. A settlement had been existing at the site for 2,600 years.

The region of western Anatolia extending along the coast from mid-Ionia (Mycale) south to Lycia and east to Phrygia. It was colonized by Ionian and Dorian Greeks forming Greek-dominated states there.
The inhabitants of Caria, known as Carians, had arrived long before the Greeks.

Gümüşkesen chambered tomb monument in Milas, built during the city's Roman Period

In the southern Turkish province of Adana’s Yumurtalık district, a rare mosaic depicting the ancient Greek god of the sea, Poseidon. It is believed to date back to the 3rd or 4th century B.C.

Sunday, 9 October 2016

Archaeologists find gold excavating royal Chinese tombs

Archaeologists digging in the royal Haihunhou cemetery in Nanchang City in eastern China have unearthed gold coins, gold sheets, gold ingots, and other relics from the Han Dynasty.

In addition to the gold coins, hoof-shaped gold ingots, jade pendants and 2,000-year-old goose-shaped bronze lamps were also found. Recent finds include 20 thin gold sheets.
The excavation site covers more than 43,000 square feet and is believed by researchers to be the tomb of Liu He. Liu He was the first Haihunhou, or marquis of Haihun State, a small kingdom in the north Jiangxi Province.

The cemetery has been subjected to archaeological exploration since 2011. More than 10,000 items have been discovered during the multiple excavations, with 110 of the items recovered put on exhibition at the Jiangxi Provincial Museum in Nanchang.

Turtle-shaped jade stamp