Friday, 6 October 2017

Antikythera shipwreck in the News

Bronze limbs, a sarcophagus lid, marble statue pieces, and a mysterious bronze disk were among the latest items found during excavations of the Antikythera shipwreck. Located just off the coast of the Greek island of Antikythera and 180 feet below the sea level, the Antikythera shipwreck continues to yield insights into Roman culture during its heyday.

The first century B.C. merchant ship would have been bound for Rome with a large stash of artifacts on board when it sank. One of the most intriguing recent finds is a small, bronze disk. Punctuated with holes and decorated with the image of a bull, it's unclear what the disk was used for. The Antikythera shipwreck has been the archaeological gift that keeps on giving. It was first discovered in 1900 by sponge divers, who spotted limbs from bronze statues. One of the most significant recent finds came last year, when archaeologists found human remains at the site. It was the first opportunity to examine 2,000-year-old DNA from the wreck.
See ----->http://psjfactoids.blogspot.ca/2016/09/antikythera-shipwreck-yields-ancient.html
See ----->http://psjfactoids.blogspot.ca/2015/01/more-antikythera-treasure.html