Monday, 23 October 2017

Marble Mosaic from Caligula's ‘Orgy Ship’ now a coffee table in NYC

The square slab of marble flooring, decorated with a floral motif made of pieces of green and red porphyry, serpentine and molded glass, was discovered at an Italian collector's Park Avenue apartment in New York City. The precious artifact was stolen from Italy's Roman Ship Museum after World War II and was seized by the New York district attorney's office from the collection of Helen Fioratti. She purchased the piece more than 45-years-ago from an aristocratic Italian family that lived on Lake Nemi. Lake Nemi is a small volcanic lake located about 30 km (19 mi) south of Rome.

The artifact dates to Caligula's reign, 37-41 AD and came from one of his three elaborate ships built at Lake Nemi. Described as “floating palaces” the ships were noted for their extreme opulence and luxury. The ships were over 70 meters long and were richly decorated with marble, gold and bronze.
After Caligula was killed, his ships were sunk and remained underwater for centuries. Benito Mussolini was the first to launch an organized exploration of the lake and two vessels were retrieved between 1928 and 1932. The third ship, which was the most luxurious of the three, was never retrieved.

The short reign of the cruel and quite possibly insane Caligula was extremely expensive for the citizens of Rome.


Lake Nemi
See ----->http://psjfactoids.blogspot.ca/2015/12/caligula-coins.html
See ----->http://psjfactoids.blogspot.ca/2017/06/roman-gold-aureii-star-in-swiss-auction.html