Wednesday, 12 November 2014

Greenland Ruby


Corundum from Fiskenaes, Nuuk, Kitaa Province, Greenland
Gemstones have been found in Greenland, including diamond, ruby, sapphire, kornerupine, tugtupite, lapis lazuli, amazonite, peridot, quartz, spinel, topaz, and tourmaline.
Most of Greenland's ruby and sapphire occurrences are located near the village of Fiskenaesset on the southwest coast.
A total of 31 ruby and sapphire occurrences have been confirmed in the Fiskenaesset district. One of these, the Aappattuloq Ruby project, is being developed by True North Gems Inc.
Roughly 10 kilograms of ruby and pink sapphire rough have been recovered. The bulk of the material is rather small, with 90% (by weight) measuring less than a quarter inch (6.3mm). The quality of the rough raises hopes that Greenland Ruby might play an important role on the world gem markets in the future.

The largest gem facetted to date weighed 0.69cts and was evaluated at $ 2.100,00 (US wholesale).

In May 2011 an initial resource calculation was announced for Aappaluttoq. The resource included indicated resources of 189,150 tonnes of material hosting 59 million grams (296 million carats) of corundum and inferred a further 21 million grams (109 million carats) to a depth of 65m.

The resource is National Instrument 43-101 compliant and is the first coloured gemstone resource ever to be published under these laws.




See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2014/03/fine-ruby.html
See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2014/03/royal-spinel-balas-ruby.html
See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2014/01/the-mughal-empire-in-gold-and-gems.html

Tuesday, 4 November 2014

Lost Gold of the Confederacy

On May 24, 1865, two wagon trains filled with gold, one containing the last of the Confederate treasury and the other money from Virginia banks, were robbed at Chennault Crossroads in Lincoln County.

Chennault Plantation was owned by the elderly Dionysius Chennault. The gold was to be returned to France who had loaned the money to support the Confederacy. Jefferson Davis had given his word that the gold would be returned regardless of the outcome of the war.
Captain Parker of the Navy and a group of other volunteers brought the gold from Richmond, Virginia, to Anderson, South Carolina, by train and from there by wagon hoping to get to Savannah.

Parker was to camp outside Washington, Georgia, where he was to meet with Jefferson Davis and receive further instructions. Parker's group camped on the Chennault place and then received word to proceed on to Augusta and then Savannah, while avoiding contact with the large number of Union troops present in Georgia. Their scouts met Union troops before they got to Augusta.
The group returned to the Chennault Plantation. Parker was unable to receive further instructions from Davis because he had already left Washington.

It was on this night that the gold disappeared, about 100 yards from the porch of the house. One theory says that the treasure was buried at the confluence of the Apalachee and Oconee rivers. Some say that the gold was divided among the locals.

Union troops later came to the Chennault Plantation to find the gold. They tortured the occupants of the house trying to force them to reveal where the gold was hidden but to no avail. The entire Chennault family was taken to Washington, DC to undergo intensive interrogation. They were questioned thoroughly as to the whereabouts of the gold, but the Chennaults could not tell anything that was not already known. They were released a few weeks later and returned to their home in Georgia.
As time went by, the Chennault plantation became known as the "golden farm," and for many years after that people came there to search for the missing gold. Down through the years, many gold coins have been found along the dirt roads near the plantation following a heavy rain storm.

Legend persists that the treasure was hastily buried on the original grounds of Chennault Plantation and remains there today.




Monday, 3 November 2014

Beyond El Dorado


Laguna de Guatavita is located in the municipality of Sesquilé, in the Cundinamarca Department of Colombia, 35 miles north-east of Bogotá.

Laguna de Guatavita was one of the sacred lakes of the Muisca, and a ritual conducted there is thought to be the basis for the legend of El Dorado.
For centuries Europeans were dazzled by the legend of a lost city of gold in South America. The truth behind this myth is even more fascinating. El Dorado – literally “the golden one” – actually refers to the ritual that took place at Lake Guatavita.

The lake is where the Muisca celebrated a ritual in which the Zipa (named "El Dorado" by the Conquistadores) was covered in gold dust, then venturing out into the water on a ceremonial raft made of rushes, he dived into the waters washing off the gold.
Bogota’s Museum of Gold looks at the reality behind the stories that excited the European imagination from the 16th century onwards, telling of a lake into which a ruler entirely covered in gold — the El Dorado or Golden One — made offerings of gold and emeralds.

Afterward, trinkets, jewelry, and other precious offerings were thrown into the waters by worshipers.

Conquistadores Lázaro Fonte and Hernán Perez de Quesada attempted to drain the lake in 1545 using a "bucket chain" of labourers. After 3 months, the water level had been reduced by 3 metres, and only a small amount of gold was recovered.

In 1580 Antonio de Sepúlveda had a notch cut deep into the rim of the lake, which managed to reduce the water level by 20 metres, before collapsing and killing many of the labourers. Various golden ornaments, jewellery and armour were found. Sepúlveda died a poor man, and is buried at the church in the small town of Guatavita.

In 1898 the lake was successfully drained by means of a tunnel that emerged in the centre. The water was eventually drained to a depth of about 4 feet of mud and slime. When the mud had dried in the sun, it set like concrete. A haul of only £500 was found, and subsequently auctioned at Sothebys of London.

The Colombian government disallowed any more draining attempts.





See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2013/07/pre-columbian-gold-in-ecuador.html
See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2013/03/paititi-lost-city-of-gold.html
See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2013/02/lost-inca-treasure.html